Lectures

The museum galleries have re-opened, however, in-person events remain on hold. Online events such as performances, lectures, art programs, and more are occuring and details can be found at our virtual Museum at Home!

Please check the Calendar page for listing of all upcoming programs and events. 

VIRTUAL PROGRAM Artistic Insights with L.F. Tantillo

General: Sunday, February 28 • 2:00pm - 3:00pm General: Sunday, March 21 • 2:00pm - 3:00pm General: Sunday, April 18 • 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Featured artist L. F. Tantillo will host monthly talks that highlight paintings currently on display in the exhibition A Sense of Time: The Historical Art of L. F. Tantillo. He will share insights into his inspirations, artistic process, historical research, and more. 

February: Overview of Exhibit

March: Native Americans and the Dutch

April; the English and the Americans (Register Here)

Please check back for future dates!

This program is offered free with a suggested donation of $10. *Please note if you wish to make a donation, the system will not automatically prompt you to do so. You must choose your registration and scroll down to "Make a Donation" to input the donation amount before checkout.* You will receive an email confirmation when your registration is complete.

The presentation will be offered live via Zoom with a Q&A session. All participants will receive the Zoom link one hour before the lecture to the email used during registration.

VIRTUAL PRESENTATION Separate Vessels: Iroquois Engagements with the Dutch of New Netherland

General: Thursday, April 29 • 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Guest Speaker Jon Parmenter, Associate Professor of History, Cornell University

In this talk, Jon Parmenter will analyze the documentary and archaeological evidence of Iroquois-Dutch interactions in New Netherland. He will shed new light on the ways in which the idea of kaswentha, an Iroquois-conceived model of mutually beneficial intergroup relations represented by a Two Row wampum belt, shaped Dutch exchanges with their Iroquois neighbors from the era of initial direct contact to the English conquest of 1664.

Register Here

This program is offered free with a suggested donation of $10. *Please note if you wish to make a donation, the system will not automatically prompt you to do so. You must choose your registration and scroll down to "Make a Donation" to input the donation amount before checkout.* You will receive an email confirmation when your registration is complete.

The presentation will be offered live via Zoom with a Q&A session. All participants will receive the Zoom link one hour before the lecture to the email used during registration.

VIRTUAL PRESENTATION A Disappearing Country: Algonkian life in the 18th Century Northeast (1700-1763)

General: Saturday, May 22 • 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Glimpse the seismic changes in Algonkian life (daily living, customs of war, adoption/captivity, alliances, friendships and marriages between Natives, Europeans and Africans) during the first half of the 18th century as the consequences of contact with new European neighbors in the Northeast rippled outward. The rising fur trade, persistent conversion efforts from Christian missionaries, epidemic disease and forced removal from tribal lands changed the balance of Algonkian life forever even as further colonial wars raged on, including Queen Anne’s, King William’s and the Seven Years’ War.

Drew Shuptar-Rayvis (Pekatawas MakataweU “Black Corn”) holds a cum laude Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Sociology from Western Connecticut State University and a Certificate Degree in Archaeology from Norwalk Community College. A true American of the mid-Atlantic region, his family includes indigenous Accomac and Pocomoke heritage, Pennsylvania Dutch, Welsh, Swiss, English, Scots-Irish, Boyko Ukrainian and Ashkanazi Jewish, he honors all of his ancestors as a practicing living historian and regularly participates in colonial era reenactments, interpretations and public educational events. He has studied and become proficient in the reading of Wampum and works diligently in the research and preservation of the Eastern Woodland languages, particularly Renape and Mahican and is educated in the many European languages at use in the Colonial Period. He was the first garden manager of Western Connecticut State University’s Permaculture Garden, and practices Native horticulture.

This program is offered free with a suggested donation of $10. *Please note if you wish to make a donation, the system will not automatically prompt you to do so. You must choose your registration and scroll down to "Make a Donation" to input the donation amount before checkout.* You will receive an email confirmation when your registration is complete.

Register Here

The presentation will be offered live via Zoom with a Q&A session. All participants will receive the Zoom link one hour before the lecture to the email used during registration.